1990

2000

2010

2015

90
Events/Highlights
Monash University merges with the Chisholm Institute of Technology
It signalled the beginning of a merger process which led to the establishment on 1 July 1990 of one of the biggest and most diverse universities in Australia.
Events/Highlights

Monash University merges with the Chisholm Institute of Technology

On 1 July 1990, Monash University formally merged with Chisholm Institute of Technology.

A new Faculty of Computing and Information Technology was formed with the merger of the Clayton departments of Computer Science and Information Systems and the Caulfield departments of Computer Technology, Information Systems and Software Development and Robotics and Digital Technology.

The 'Heads of Agreement' document between Monash and Chisholm was signed by both governing councils on 11 May 1989. It signalled the beginning of a merger process which led to the establishment of one of the biggest and most diverse universities in Australia on 1 July 1990.

Image. Signing of Heads of Agreement between Monash and Chisholm Comptroller Mr Peter Wade, Vice-Chancellor Professor Mal Logan, President of Chisholm Council Mr Paul Ramler, Director of Chisholm Dr Geoff Vaughan, Dr Graham Trevaskis, 1989. Monash University Archives

90
Staff
Cliff Bellamy: The Faculty of Computing and IT and its new Dean
The new Foundation Dean of the Faculty was to be Professor Cliff Bellamy, a stalwart of the early Monash days and the driving force behind the establishment of the Department of Computer Science.
Staff

Cliff Bellamy: The Faculty of Computing and IT and its new Dean

The Dawkin’s reforms of the 1980s were pivotal events leading to the merger between Monash and the Chisholm Institute on the 1st July 1990, and to the subsequent establishment of the new Faculty of Computing and Information Technology on the 13th of August 1990. This merger brought together the disciplines of Software Engineering, Computer Science, Business Systems, Information Systems, and Information Management under the new Faculty.

The new Foundation Dean of the Faculty was to be Professor Cliff Bellamy, a stalwart of the early Monash days and the driving force behind the establishment of the Department of Computer Science. Under his leadership, the Faculty welcomed increased numbers of domestic students as well as an increased cohort of international students. The new Bachelor of Computing was approved and introduced in 1991. Professor Bellamy was to take the Faculty into the realms of the age of the internet and the new technologies accompanying it. Professor Cliff Bellamy retired in September 1996 after overseeing the creation of the new Faculty and its new directions.

Image. Professor Bellamy explaining MONET node. Photographer: Tony Miller

 

 

90
Events/Highlights
Technology is the future
'Virtually every graduate, no matter what discipline area, comes face to face with the impact of technology' Dr Geoffrey Vaughan.
Events/Highlights

Technology is the future

In the last edition of Chisholm Gazette, Dr Geoffrey Vaughan, Director of Chisholm wrote about the merger stressing that 'In the future, technology will play an even greater role than in the past. Virtually every graduate, no matter what discipline area, comes face to face with the impact of technology. In a way, every graduate is a scientist.'

Image. Last edition of the Chisholm Gazette vol 7, iss 1, 7 April 1990.

 

90
Staff
Pearl Levin: Breaking down barriers for women in computing
Pearl Levin was appointed executive director of the Pearcey Centre for Computing in 1990.
Staff

Pearl Levin: Breaking down barriers for women in computing

When Pearl Levin took her first step towards a career in computers, married women were not allowed to hold permanent teaching positions in colleges or universities. Twenty-six years later, this grandmother of three, heads one of Victoria's largest computer training organisations, the Pearcey Centre for Computing, part of the Faculty of Computing and Information Technology. Mrs Levin graduated in 1976 with a Certificate in Computer Operating and Coding and completed a Bachelor of Applied Science in Computing at Caulfield in 1980. She joined the Pearcey Centre at its inception in 1973 as a consultant and part-time lecturer and succeeded the executive director, Mr Doug Burns in 1990.

Image. Mrs Pearl Levin, Executive Director, Pearcey Centre for Computing. Monash University Archives

 

90
Staff
Phil Steele: Head of Department of Computer Technology
Phil's background in IT stemmed back to 1968 when he commenced study at Caulfield Institute of Technology in the relatively new discipline of Electronic Data Processing (EDP).
Staff

Phil Steele: Head of Department of Computer Technology

In 1990, Phil Steele took on the role of Head of the Department of Computer Technology (appointed Professor in 1992). In 1978, Phil Steele had commenced as an academic at Caulfield Institute of Technology/Chisholm Institute of Technology. Professor Phil Steele held a variety of positions including lecturer, senior lecturer/course leader and principal lecturer and Head, Department of Software Development. In his 2011 farewell article the Dean of IT, John Rosenberg recalled 'that if there was anything difficult you needed achieved during that time, Phil was the man to appoint'. In 2003 Prof Steele was appointed Academic Director at Peninsula and in 2004 he became Academic Director of both Berwick and Peninsula campuses. Phil's background in IT stemmed back to 1968 when he commenced study at Caulfield Institute of Technology in the relatively new discipline of Electronic Data Processing (EDP). Professor Steele retired in 2011.

91
Education
First graduates of the Bachelor of Business Systems
A new cooperative education program between the University and industry.
Education

First graduates of the Bachelor of Business Systems

A new cooperative education program between the University and industry which commenced in 1988 had its first graduates in 1991. Although the national economy appeared to be descending into recession, most BBusSys students managed to obtain full-time employment. This success in gaining employment became the norm over years to come.

Image: Dean of Computing and Information Technology Professor Cliff Bellamy (far left), with digital corporate consultant Mr Max Burnet, Gartner Group, Pacific managing director Mr Andrew Brooks, IBM senior system strategist Mr Keith Frampton, NCR branch Executive Officer Mr Bart Grotegoed and Bachelor of Business Systems Director of Studies Mr Ed Wilson. Monash University Archives.

92
Staff
Rob Hagan: IT successful in Vice-Chancellor's Award
'We want to enhance distinctive teaching strengths, especially those that emphasise the unique character of Monash graduate and undergraduate courses.'
Staff

Rob Hagan: IT successful in Vice-Chancellor's Award

Rob Hagan of the Faculty of IT Caulfield was one of the three winners of the Inaugural Vice-Chancellor's Awards for Distinguished Teaching. 1992 was the first year the awards were given. Vice-Chancellor Mal Logan emphasied that teaching and research were considered the major activities of the university and 'excellence in teaching is one of Monash's major objectives'.

Image. Winners of the Vice-Chancellor's Awards for Distinguished Teaching. (from left) Ms Joycey Tooher, Law, Mr Rob Hagan, Computing and Information Technology, and Dr Anne McDougall, Education, 1992. Monash University Archives.

93
Events/Highlights
New buildings for the faculty
New buildings for Clayton, Peninsula and Gippsland.
Events/Highlights

New buildings for the faculty

The completion and occupation of new buildings for the Faculty of Computing and Information Technology at the Clayton, Peninsula and Gippsland campuses vastly improved accommodation for the faculty.

94
Education
New School for the Faculty of Information Technology
The School of Librarianship, Archives and Records joins the Faculty of IT and introduces the Bachelor of Information Management.
Education

New School for the Faculty of Information Technology

The Graduate School of Librarianship, Archives and Records, originally part of the Faculty of Arts, was reviewed in 1993 and as a result joined the Faculty of Computing and Information Technology at the start of 1994 as a department. It introduced the Bachelor of Information Management degree course in 1995. The course was thought to be the first of its type in Australia. It specifically aimed to train people to work in the information management field, requiring the study of non-computing subjects and therefore created opportunities for students interested in information technology but not highly technical work. It taught all levels from undergraduate to doctorate, offering a Bachelor of Information Management degree, graduate diplomas, masters and PhD programs.

95
Education
Double degrees; a new Faculty initiative to improve student choice
To bring the Faulty's priorities of becoming more interdisciplinary and to give the students a broader educational experience, double degrees were introduced between 1995-1998.
Education

Double degrees; a new Faculty initiative to improve student choice

The Faculty's focus on developing and improving courses to meet the constantly evolving requirements of the IT community and industry was reflected in the development of a series of new double degrees starting with the Bachelor of Business (Accounting)/Bachelor of Computing in 1995 in collaboration with the Faculty of Business and Economics. In subsequent years, this was then further expanded to additional double degree offerings with Business and Economics and yet more double degrees offerings in collaboration with the Faculties of Arts, Education, Engineering and Law. The focus of the Faculty was becoming more interdisciplinary and giving students more choices in what they studied and in potential career opportunities thereafter.

 

 

 

 

95
Research
Research into electronic journals
Project funding helped to develop e-journals research in Australia and internationally.
Research

Research into electronic journals

D. Schauder and A. Treloar of FIT collaborated in a project sponsored by the Australian Vice-Chancellors’ Committee (AVCC) and CSIRO to explore the potentialities of electronic journals. A particular focus was Psyche – a pioneering, peer-reviewed, international e-journal in the field of consciousness, founded in Australia by Dr Patrick Wilken and Dr Kevin Korb in 1993. The project helped the development of e-journals in Australia and internationally.

96
Research
Contribution to ARC Strategic Review
Research

Contribution to ARC Strategic Review

FIT and the Monash University Library (G. Johanson, D. Schauder, E. Lim) in collaboration with the Australian Academy of the Humanities and the Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Technology (DEST), provided an invited input to the ARC Strategic Review of Humanities Research and Training on the theme of ‘Libraries in the information infrastructure for humanities scholars in Australia’.

97
Staff
John Rosenberg: Second Dean of the Faculty of IT
Prof. Rosenberg seized the opportunities provided by the .com boom to start a significant number of changes in both research and education that transformed the Faculty into a dynamic and innovative institution.
Staff

John Rosenberg: Second Dean of the Faculty of IT

In 1997 Professor John Rosenberg returned to Monash University to become the second Dean of the Faculty of Information Technology. John Rosenberg had completed his Bachelor of Science with Honours in 1975, and his Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science in 1979, at Monash. Before coming back to Monash, Prof. Rosenberg had been Senior Visiting Research Fellow at the University of St Andrews, Scotland (1989), Head of the Discipline of Computer Science at the University of Newcastle (1990), and Head of the Basser Department of Computer Science at the University of Sydney (1994).  Prof. Rosenberg seized the opportunities provided by the .com boom to start a significant number of changes in both research and education that transformed the Faculty into a dynamic and innovative institution.  He had a strong interest in the use of technology in education, encouraged many previously teaching-only staff to become research active, and established the first research-professorships. Under his leadership, the Faculty moved beyond a mere collection of departments to became a more unified entity.

97
Research
Computing Education Research Group
Research

Computing Education Research Group

The Computing Education Research Group (CERG) of the Faculty of Information Technology is interested in contemporary educational issues in computing and seeks to provide a vision for the pedagogical future of computing. Research projects encompass a wide range of aspects of computing education.

CERG was established in December 1997 as a group to promote the role of teaching scholarship within the Faculty of Information Technology by the new Dean, Prof John Rosenberg. John was always a keen advocate of the importance of teaching, and he saw this group as an avenue to build up the research profile of the many academic staff coming from a research-poor environment of the ex-CAE sector within the faculty. CERG has as its main foci two aspects of research in computing education. These are: ways of improving the teaching and learning of computing topics and the ways of using technology to assist with the teaching process.

97
Research
Senior Management
Research

Senior Management

Six of 20 senior management, academic and executive staff who share the first name 'John'. Pictured (from left, front) Assoc. Professor John Hurst, Professor John Rosenberg (holding picture of Sir John Monash) and Professor John Crossley; (from left, rear) Professor John Anderson, Mr John Julian and Mr John Trembath.

97
Events/Highlights
Restructuring of the Faculty
Restructuring strengthens the disciplinary areas of the Faculty.
Events/Highlights

Restructuring of the Faculty

In 1997 there were seven departments spanning the Clayton and Caulfield campuses.  A decision was made that restructuring the departments into three Schools was the way forward for the Faculty to strengthen the disciplinary areas of the Faculty.  The three new Schools formed were: School of Business Systems, School of Computer Science and Software Engineering (CSSE) and School of Information Management Systems (SIMS)

97
Staff
Logan Fellowship awarded
Staff

Logan Fellowship awarded

Professor Maria Garcia de la Banda, who is now the Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Information Technology, was awarded the first and only prestigious Logan Fellowship in the Faculty of Information Technology - a role she held for 6 years.

97
Events/Highlights
The Millellium Bug - a cause for concern?
Events/Highlights

The Millellium Bug - a cause for concern?

The Millennium Bug: January 1, 2001 will not be the end of the world but it's bound to cause major inconvenience to any organisation that relies on computers, says Mr Max Robinson, the head of computer systems support at Monash University. Mr Robinson, of Monash University's Administrative Management Information Systems (AMIS) unit, is referring to the so-called 'millennium bug', a computer problem which threatens to affect a significant proportion of the world's computers. 'Monash's administration is already having problems recording leave for the year 2000. The computer system can't deal with it. It's irritating, but not critical'' says Mr Robinson, who also chairs the Monash University Year 2000 Compliance Project Executive Committee (Y2KC), a group specifically set up by the university this year to tackle the problem. With the establishment of Y2KC, Monash has embarked on a strategy to get around the problem as best it can. And not a moment too soon.

98
Events/Highlights
Monash Malaysia opens its doors
Established in 1998, Monash Malaysia is the first foreign university campus in Malaysia that operates in partnership with the Sunway Education Group.
Events/Highlights

Monash Malaysia opens its doors

Monash's first International campus is opened in Malaysia. Two senior Monash academics will commence in their new roles as heads of the two schools at the campus. Dr Robin Pollard will head the School of Business and Economics and Information Technology and Associate Professor Robin Alfredson will head the School of Engineering, Medicine and Science. The new Monash University Sunway Campus Malaysia is the result of a partnership between Monash and Sunway College.

 

Image:Monash University Sunway Campus celebrates its opening with some of the 431 students.

98
Staff
Faculty staff member receives prestigious award
Staff

Faculty staff member receives prestigious award

One of the most notable achievements in 1998 was the recognition of the exceptional teaching and learning of Angela Carbone from the Faculty of Computing and Information Technology, who received the Prime Minister's Award as Australian University Teacher of the Year in the category of Computing and Information Services.

98
Education
First Degree Course at the Berwick Campus
Bachelor of Multimedia-Berwick's first degree course
Education

First Degree Course at the Berwick Campus

In 1995 Monash University established a new campus at Berwick to take advantage of the Victorian government planning priority of the south-eastern growth corridor.  The present Faculty of IT on the Berwick campus began in 1998 with the introduction of the Bachelor of Multimedia followed a couple of years later with the Bachelor of Electronic Commerce.

 

Image: Aerial view of construction of Berwick campus 1990 by Christopher Alexander Photography

99
Education
Global IT giant backs new Monash degree
Education

Global IT giant backs new Monash degree

Monash's Faculty of Information Technology launch an Australian, and possibly a world-first degree in network computing, commencing in 1999. IT Faculty Dean, Professor John Rosenberg, said the course would have an initial intake of 60 students, but he expected that number to grow significantly. The Authorised Academic Java Campus (AAJC) program, which is expected to attract students from across Australia as well as overseas, will see the establishment of a centre at Monash's Peninsula campus that will provide students with training in the Internet programming language Java. The degree has been sponsored by global computing giant Sun Microsystem and will help prepare graduates for new careers in growing IT industry areas such as networked computing focussing on core areas of Java and object-oriented programming, Internet web design, data communications and networks, and distributed systems. The program was an example of how universities and business could collaborate to further open standards-based technology, better prepare students for the workforce, and benefit the local economy.

99
Research
Computer Clusters
Research

Computer Clusters

Professor David Abramson says computer clusters are a viable way to achieve supercomputer-like performance at a relatively low cost. Photos by Richard Crompton, 1999.

99
Events/Highlights
A History of Business Systems degree launched
Events/Highlights

A History of Business Systems degree launched

The book, 'Cooperating for Excellence: Monash University Bachelor of Business Systems - the first 10 years - 1988-98', was written by Seamus O'Hanlon, who teaches in Monash's History department. Speaking at the launch, Mr Finn said he believed the history was being published at a most appropriate time with the current critical shortage of appropriately skilled people to meet Australia's needs in the field of Information Technology. The head of the School of Business Systems, Professor Rob Willis, said the Bachelor of Business Systems' story over the past 10 years had been about responding to the community's changing needs. "It is about never being prepared to accept second best and always being ready to challenge the comfortable paradigm," he said.

99
Education
Sun Monash Network computing launch
Education

Sun Monash Network computing launch

At the launch of Monash's Sun Authorised Academic Java Campus are, from left, Sun Microsystems Australia managing director Mr Russ Bate, Minister for Information Technology and Multimedia The Hon. Alan Stockdale MLA, and Faculty of Information Technology Dean, Professor John Rosenberg.

99
Research
IT Faculty builds its own supercomputer cluster
Research

IT Faculty builds its own supercomputer cluster

The Faculty of Information Technology purchased a large Pentium computer cluster to support research projects in the schools of Computer Science and Software Engineering and Business Systems. The hardware, more correctly called a metacomputer, consists of 60 Pentium II and III processors on both the Caulfield and Clayton campuses, and the two halves are connected by the University's high­ speed ATM connection. Prof. David Abramson, Head of the School of Computer Science and Software Engineering, stated at the time, 'this technology is of great interest to any organisation with a substantial computer network.' Monash's cluster has been used for a number of projects, including:

• crack prediction - joint work with the Department of Mechanical Engineering;

• public health policy simulation - joint work with the MacFarlane Burnett Centre for Medical Research;

• calibration of Australian X-ray pri­mary standard - joint work with the Australian Radiation and Nuclear Safety Agency; and

• aircraft dynamics simulation - joint work with Defence Science and Technology Organisation.

00
Research
Virtual Induction Program
Research

Virtual Induction Program

A virtual induction program created by Monash's School of Business Systems is helping pharmaceutical company, Bristol-Myers Squibb, reap the benefits of multimedia technology.

00
Research
Multimedia makes a difference
Research

Multimedia makes a difference

Using images, video, sound and text, Dr Raymond Li and his team from Monash University's School of Business Systems began creating multimedia training CD-ROMs for organisations in 1997. By 2000, they were getting so many requests they have to turn projects down. Professor Rob Willis, head of the School of Business Systems, emphasised the importance that the output of a university, although always research-oriented, should also match the needs of the wider community.'We only take on projects that we feel will increase knowledge in the field of multimedia in some way.'

00
Events/Highlights
Hamilton at the Unisys Monash IT Summer School
Events/Highlights

Hamilton at the Unisys Monash IT Summer School

Unisys marketing director Ms Wendy Stubbs with student Tim Clare from Good Shepherd College, Hamilton at the Unisys Monash IT Summer School.

00
Events/Highlights
Experiencing IT over the summer: Monash IT Summer School
Events/Highlights

Experiencing IT over the summer: Monash IT Summer School

Sixty of the state's brightest Year 10 students from schools all around Victoria, attend a five-day residential program aimed to give the students a good understanding of information technology to encourage them to take up this career option. The Dean of Information Technology Professor John Rosenberg felt it was very important to get a mix of female and male students from both rural and metropolitan areas, from both government and private schools. Officially opening the summer school Minister for State and Regional Development The Honorable John Brumby said that IT drives growth, opportunities and innovation. 'The information technology and computing industry is the cornerstone of the state's economic prosperity of the future. The growth in the industry is truly staggering,' he said.

Listing three things they learned during the week, one student summed it up by writing: "Monash rocks; there is a future in the IT business; and uni life involves a lot of walking."

01
Events/Highlights
The Opening of Monash South Africa
Monash opens its South Africa campus with state-of the-art facilities in IT.
Events/Highlights

The Opening of Monash South Africa

Monash expands to South Africa In early 2000, Monash announced that the university's 'global vision has been taken a step further with approval to establish a full campus in Johannesburg, South Africa. The campus, which opened in 2001, is located on a 100 hectare site in Roodepoort, 20k in north-west Johannesburg. At the time Pro vice-chancellor Professor John Anderson said the students were very impressed with the state-of-the-art facilities available at the campus, in particular, the IT and communications facilities, which included the new computer lab, sophisticated electronic resources and dual internet access.

Image: Monash South Africa Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor John Anderson (centre) with Bachelor of Arts students Mr Mduduzi Mabuza and Ms Lanese Venter

01
Alumni & Friends
Alumnus Stephen White
Alumnus Stephen White holds a BComp from Monash. He has established an on-line service for people with rheumatic disease.
Alumni & Friends

Alumnus Stephen White

Stephen White

BComp 1996

In 2001 Stephen was recognised for his career achievements at the leading edge of technology, and for his initiative in establishing an online service for people with rheumatic diseases and was awarded a Distinguished Alumni Award for the Faculty of IT.

01
Events/Highlights
Monash Museum of Computing History officially opened.
The technological advances of computing over the years is displayed in a newly opened museum here at Caulfield which will provide education and information on the social impact and technological advances in computing history.
Events/Highlights

Monash Museum of Computing History officially opened.

The Monash Museum of Computing History (MMoCH) was established by the Faculty of Information Technology in 2001 and is directed by Associate Professor Judithe Sheard. The broad aim of the Museum was to establish a collection of historical reference material and create an educational program for students and the general public on the social impact and technological developments in computer history. The Museum collects information on the development and use of information technology at Monash University.

The Museum officially opened in 2001 by Dr Peter Thorne of the University of Melbourne with Professor John Rosenberg, Dean of Faculty of IT. The museum features both the technological development of computing and the social impact of these developments over the last 50 years. The original display had both computing and calculating material showing the development of information technology at Monash. The Museum is an ongoing project of the Faculty of IT and aims to provide a visual display of computing history as well as establish a reference collection demonstrating the use of computing technology at the university.

 

Image: Dr Peter Thorne, University of Melbourne and Professor John Rosenberg, Dean of Faculty IT launching the Museum of Computing History in 2001

01
Events/Highlights
Berwick's First School Established
Berwick established a new School of Multimedia.
Events/Highlights

Berwick's First School Established

The School of Multimedia Systems was established in 2001 on the back of the success of the Multimedia degree already established in 1998. The degree was so popular and successful that it attracted large numbers of students, instigating the need for a dedicated School at the campus.

01
Events/Highlights
Monash's First Computer
Events/Highlights

Monash's First Computer

The Ferranti Sirius Computer, which was stored under a stairwell in Building 28 at Clayton campus for many years, displayed here in the Monash Museum of Computing.

01
Research
Research project for the International Olympic Committee
Research

Research project for the International Olympic Committee

Resulting from an initiative of the Dean, Prof. John Rosenberg, a joint team chiefly from FIT's Information and Telecommunication Needs Research Group (ITNR) - Director Dr Kirsty Williamson - and Monash University Library undertook a major commissioned research project on Transfer of Knowledge for the International Olympic Committee (IOC), aimed at enabling smoother transfer of know-how between successive host cities' Olympics organising committees. Performed in collaboration with IOC Headquarters Lausanne, and with the Salt Lake City, Athens and Torino Games Organising Committees. Contributed to the development of the ongoing OGKM (Olympic Games Knowledge Management) program.

01
Research
IOC President and Monash Vice Chancellor
Research

IOC President and Monash Vice Chancellor

IOC president Dr Jacques Rogge with Monash vice-chancellor Professor David Robinson.

02
Events/Highlights
Faculty of IT Peak of Success to the Bubble's Burst
The Faculty had productive, lucrative years up until 2002 after which followed a decline in student numbers in IT, University finances were under great pressures and finally in 2004, the bubble had burst.
Events/Highlights

Faculty of IT Peak of Success to the Bubble's Burst

In the years leading up to 2002 saw the Faculty grow and become evermore successful. There were around 6,000 students, both international and domestic and around 328 full time staff.  The Faculty operated on 5 Australian campuses and 2 international campuses; Malasia and south Africa.  The Faculty comprised 7 discipline-based Schools along with a Central Faculty Office and offered 10 undergraduate degrees and 18 post graduate courses.  Things could not have looked better.

However, prediction dictated on the basis of global trends in IT jobs that student numbers would decline and that all areas of the University were under financial pressure.  By 2003, this was the case and as a consequence the following years of the Faculty saw huge changes in staff and student numbers.  By 2004, the Faculty was in trouble and it followed that redundancies were iminent after a Faculty review.

 

 

03
Staff
Academic voice in ICT industry
Staff

Academic voice in ICT industry

The Associate Dean of Graduate Studies in the Faculty of Information Technology, Mr Chris Avram, was elected Vice-President of the Australian Computer Society (ACS) – the first academic to be elected to the ACS national executive in eight years. “I feel honored that my ACS colleagues have entrusted me as their vice-president and I expect my period of tenure to bring great benefits to both society and the IT education sector,” he said.

03
Research
FIT contributes to World Summit on the Information Society
Research

FIT contributes to World Summit on the Information Society

FIT's Centre for Community Networking Research (CCNR) undertook a major role in Australia's contribution to the UN/ITU World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS). Contracted by Australian government's Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts (DCITA) and Monash CCNR - in collaboration with the University of Central Queensland - led the formation of the Roundtable on Australian Civil Society (RACS) which conducted national consultations leading to Australian Civil Society inputs for Phase 1 of the Summit in Geneva, 2003. The same team with RACS undertook follow-up consultations - urban, regional and rural - providing inputs to Phase 2 of the Summit in Tunis, 2005 and concurrently to Australian domestic ICT policy. Dr Larry Stillman of CCNR was a leading contributor to the WSIS related work. Prof. Graeme Johanson and Prof. Don Schauder of CCNR served as members of the Australian Government delegation to the Tunis Summit.

04
Alumni & Friends
Jean Whyte Fund for Librarianship and Archives
Alumni & Friends

Jean Whyte Fund for Librarianship and Archives

In 2004 Jean Whyte, former foundation Professor in the Graduate School of Librarianship, established in 1975, generously bequeathed monies to Monash University. In consultation with Dr Brian J McMullin, Trustee, the Professor Jean Whyte Fund for Librarianship and Archives was established. This fund supports academic research in librarianship, archives and records in the Faculty of Information Technology. Not only does it support for research, but the bequest also supports the annual Jean Whyte lecture. Jean Whyte's sister, Phyllis Whyte, also bequeathed a substantial part of her estate to Monash University in honour of her sister.

04
Staff
Ron Weber: Third Dean of the Faculty of IT
Staff

Ron Weber: Third Dean of the Faculty of IT

In 2004 Professor Ron Weber became the third Dean of Faculty of Information Technology. Prof. Weber had graduated in 1972 with first-class honours and a University Medal in Accounting from the University of Queensland, and completed an MBA and PhD in Management Information Systems at the University of Minnesota. Before coming to Monash, Prof. Weber worked as a programmer, systems analyst, and project manager in the Queensland Main Roads Department (1973), became  Reader in Commerce at The University of Queensland (1979), and was the inaugural appointment to the GWA Chair in Commerce also at the University of Queensland (1993). During this time Prof. Weber was already an internationally renown academic who had received many awards for his contribution to teaching and research, including the 2000 Prime Minister's Award for University Teacher of the Year, the Association for Information Systems (AIS) fellow award in 2000, and had the honour of being the first Australian to be Editor in Chief of MIS Quarterly.

 Professor Weber joined Monash just after the .com bubble had burst, resulting in a complex time of cutbacks for the entire IT sector. These cutbacks also affected the Faculty, requiring a very significant reduction in staff numbers mainly due to reduced student enrolments.  Prof. Weber had the unenviable task of performing these cuts, reducing the Faculty to half his previous size. He managed to do this while at the same time refocusing the Faculty's strong role in research and bringing it back to prosperity. By the time Prof. Weber left to take up the position of Pro Vice-Chancellor and Campus President of Monash, South Africa in 2013, the Faculty was stronger than ever before with significant growth in student numbers, a high quality set of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, and a very strong group of researchers and educators focused on quality outcomes.  Further, it was under his leadership -- and his his motto 'one Faculty one Future'  -- that the unification of the Faculty was completed.

 Image: Professor Ron Weber, Dean of Faculty of Information Technology

04
Events/Highlights
Multimedia Centre - Berwick
A dedicated $10 million multimedia centre opens at Moansh's Berwick campus. It is the next step in the developmen of the Berwick campus.
Events/Highlights

Multimedia Centre - Berwick

A $10 million dedicated multimedia centre was officially opened at Berwick. Building 903 was officially opened on Friday 1 October by the former Federal Liberal member for the seat of La Trobe, Mr Bob Charles.  It comprises five personal computer laboratories, four computer studios, a video-editing room, a sound room, a 250-seat lecture theatre and three 25-seat tutorial rooms that can be used for conferences and seminars.

Vice-chancellor Professor Richard Larkins said the centre was a very exciting initiative for Monash overall.

"One of the special things about Monash is its multi-campus structure which allows it to develop particular strengths at different campuses and to interact in a unique way with local communities," he said.

The acting head of the School of Multimedia Systems at Berwick, Mr Lindsay Smith, said it was a great joy for the school to move in to the dedicated multimedia centre.

Image: From left: Mr Bob Charles, vice-chancellor Professor Richard Larkins and Berwick campus director Professor Phillip Steele.


04
Research
Summit in Tunis
Research

Summit in Tunis

Professor Don Schauder and Dr Graeme Johanson, as chairman and director of the Centre for Community Networking Research in the faculty, were invited by the Australian government to take part in the week-long summit in Tunis in 2005.

05
Events/Highlights
Difficult Years; To fold or to merge? That was the Question.
Events/Highlights

Difficult Years; To fold or to merge? That was the Question.

As a result of the dot.com industry collapse of 2000, it was clear by 2003 there was a surplus of graduates in the IT marketplace which resulted in reduced enrolments in the faculty for some years afterwards. The state of the industry has always influenced computing and computer science within academic institutions. A major review was undertaken during 2004, resulting in some major changes.

The two schools at Caulfield and the two schools at Clayton were merged: At Caulfield, the School of Computer Science and Software Engineering and the School of Information Management Systems were merged to form the Caulfiled School of Information Technology; at Clayton, the School of computer Science and Software Engineering merged with the School of Business Systems to form the Clayton School of Information Technology, thereby creating campus-based rather than discipline-based schools. Many functions of the central Faculty Office were reduced or incorporated into these schools. As a result, approximately 14 academic staff and 10 professional staff took Voluntary Separation Packages at the end of 2005 and early 2006. By the end of 2006, the Faculty had completed a second round of major cut backs, with the loss of another 35 academic staff and 21 professional staff. Although this was an incredibly difficult and painful experience for the Faculty and its staff, the Faculty survived and learnt valuable lessons through the process; it developed into a Faculty that is sustainable, adaptable and interdisciplinary.

05
Events/Highlights
Monash's Museum of Computing opens new exhibition
Monash's first computer, the Ferranti Sirius, forms the centrepiece of the museum. Also featured is a mini computer PDP9, the same model used at the Parkes Observatory during the moon landing in 1969.
Events/Highlights

Monash's Museum of Computing opens new exhibition

Displaying almost 50 years of Australian computing history, the expanded and relocated Monash Museum of Computing History was opened by Museum Victoria chief executive officer Dr Patrick Greene in May 2005. The new museum exhibition developed by Sarah Rood highlights the impact that computer technology has had on everyday life and how our use of it has changed over the years. Monash's first computer, the 43-year-old Ferranti Sirius, forms the centrepiece of the museum. Also featured is a mini computer PDP9, the same model used at the Parkes Observatory during the moon landing in 1969. A chronology of computer usage, backed by a photographic timeline of current events and popular culture, explores how technology has developed from the 1950s. The museum is located on level two, B block, Monash University Caulfield campus.

05
2005 - Henry Linger-Awarded Bill Kent Prato Research Fellowship
Associate Professor Henry Linger was awarded the inaugural Bill Kent Prato Research Fellowship to run a workshop on synergy between immunology and computer science.

2005 - Henry Linger-Awarded Bill Kent Prato Research Fellowship

Associate Professor Henry Linger was awarded the inaugural Bill Kent Prato Research Fellowship in 2005.The Fellowship was to run a two-day workshop and a two-week NATO ARW summer school on natural and artificial immune systems (NAIS) in Prato. As an emerging interdisciplinary field, NAIS was a venue to explore complex problems and innovative methods to address such intractable problems. Specifically NAIS was initiated to investigate the potential synergy between the immunology and computer science by investigating the many attack/defense/adaptation strategies in natural systems, such as response to HIV, or those implemented in artificial systems, like virus attacks on computer systems. 

 

Image: Dr Henry Linger (left), winner of the inaugural Bill Kent Prato Research Fellowship, with Professor Bill Kent and Professor Merran Evans.

05
Research
Development Informatics: Connecting India and Africa
Development Informatics research connects India and Africa.
Research

Development Informatics: Connecting India and Africa

In 2005 FIT's Prof. Ed Wilson (Associate Dean Development, and formerly founding Head, School of IT, Monash South Africa) sought to assess how far Indian research achievements in DI (Development Informatics) might be applicable to Africa. Prof. Krithi Ramamritham, world renowned founder of DIL (Development Informatics Laboratory) at IITB (Indian Institute of Technology Bombay) hosted a delegation from FIT (Prof. Don Schauder, Dr Judy Backhouse and Dr Jacques Steyn) to study current projects of DIL. Their report initiated an active DI agenda at FIT's South African and Australian campuses led by Dr Jacques Steyn and A/Prof. Graeme Johanson, and the formation of IDIA (International Development Informatics Association).

 

Image: : Don Schauder (left) and Judy Backhouse (centre) at Shardanagar, Baramati, central node of a multilingual advice network of agronomists and farmers.

05
Staff
Chris Avram elected to international IT federation
Adjunct Research Fellow, Chris Avram elected as a trustee of the International Federation of Information Processing which represents IT societies from 56 countries and regions.
Staff

Chris Avram elected to international IT federation

The Faculty of IT Adjunct Senior Research Fellow Mr Chris Avram was elected a trustee of the International Federation for Information Processing. 'Australians are prominent within the federation in areas as diverse as computer science, education, artificial intelligence and information security,' he said. "We are well represented on working groups, in executive positions and on technical committees, so Australia is very much valued for the contributions of its academic community.' Chris Avram is currently a Research Fellow at Monash University.

06
Staff
2006/7 - John Hurst is elected Chair of the Academic Board
Staff

2006/7 - John Hurst is elected Chair of the Academic Board

In 2005 A/Prof John Hurst was elected as Chair of the Academic Board for a two-year term (2006/2007), a very significant honour and recognition of his leadership at Monash. During his term as Chair, he instigated a review of the structure of Academic Board and its subcommittees (since adopted), as well as moving it from a paper-based committee to a more modern electronic agenda system.  He was also instrumental in establishing an annual gathering of Chairs of Academic Boards across all Australian Universities, a practice which it still in place.

A/Prof Hurst was also Associate Dean Teaching for 8 years (1996-2004), the longest in the Faculty's history. During his tenure as Associate Dean Education, he established several key teaching reforms, including the requirements for supplying students with teaching unit outcomes and logistics at the start of semester (subsequently adopted across the university), and the avatar software  for managing teaching unit objectives now known as Monatar, and which had as its objective the enabling of all teaching academics to take a more direct role in the design of learning objectives and outcomes for the units they taught. Monatar has been running successfully since 2000. John also instigated electronic recording and dissemination of Faculty Education Committee agendas and minutes, a practice subsequently taken up across the faculty in all its committees.

06
Research
Inauguration of the Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics
Research

Inauguration of the Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics

The Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics (COSI) was formally approved in late 2006. COSI addresses information, evidence and knowledge requirements of society, organisations, community/social networks and individuals. COSI’s main multidisciplinary research flagship program, 'IT for Resilient Communities', addresses the real-life digital divide in society and the empowering role information technologies can play in these communities. It encompasses research and education in community and developmental informatics, health informatics, indigenous community archiving and cultural visualisation of community heritage.

COSI fosters interdisciplinary collaboration with national and international researchers, graduate research students and industry, professional and community research partners. COSI has successfully secured funding from the ARC, industry and community partners, cultural heritage institutions, health and government organisations and has been very generously supported by philanthropic funds.

Its researchers come from areas such as archives and recordkeeping, community informatics, information and knowledge management, library and information studies. COSI researchers collaborate with both other faculties, educational institutions and industry partners.

 

Photo: Director Professor Sue McKemmish

06
Research
Launch of the Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics
The Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics (COSI) was approved as a Faculty Centre in 2006.
Research

Launch of the Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics

The Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics (COSI) directed by Professor Sue McKemmish was established by the Academic Board in late 2006. It was officially launched in September 2007 by the Deputy Vice Chancellor Research Professor Edwina Cornish. COSI aims to address the information, evidence and knowledge requirements of society, organisations, community networks, social networks and individuals.  It encompasses research and education in community and developmental informatics, health informatics, indigenous community archiving and cultural visualisation of community heritage.

The Centre fosters interdisciplinary collaboration with national and international researchers, graduate research students, and industry, professional and community research partners including: not-for profit organisations, archival and cultural heritage institutions, government agencies, health institutions, Indigenous communities and health consumers.

COSI has gone on to pioneer multidisciplinary research in its flagship program, IT for Resilient Communities, which addresses the real-life digital divide in society and the empowering role information technologies and systems can play in communities.

 



Image:  Director of COSI, Professor Sue McKemmish

06
Education
Reviewing the Undergraduate Program
Education

Reviewing the Undergraduate Program

In 2005 the faculty reviewed its undergraduate programs with the effect that in 2006 it discontinued or revised many programs and introduced new or amended courses. The purpose of these changes was to ensure the faculty’s degrees continued to meet the changing needs of both students and employers. The faculty redeveloped a suite of its undergraduate first-year subjects comprising a number of common core units to be undertaken by all students. This redevelopment was designed to make undergraduate programs more personalised in accordance with a review undertaken in 2004.

06
Research
Industry Engagement Awards honour Monash IT staff
Research

Industry Engagement Awards honour Monash IT staff

Professor Don Schauder and team were honoured in the Monash University Inaugural Industry Engagement Awards for collaborative research achievements - 2006. The award recognised the cumulative achievements of the two interlinked research teams of which Prof. Schauder was Chair, namely Centre for Community Networking Research (CCNR) - Director A/Prof. Graeme Johanson, and Information and Telecommunications Research Group (ITNR) - Director Dr Kirsty Williamson. Both teams are units of COSI (Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics (founded and led by Prof. Sue McKemmish). The work recognised was undertaken in collaboration with community, government of industry partners and fell into four clusters: 1) collaborative technologies and e-research 2) user-centred design and the knowledge commons 3) social network analysis and community based organisations, and 4) development informatics, civil society and e-democracy. Research by PhD students from Australia, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam and South South Africa played a major part in these achievements, as did Monash's campuses, centres and partners in Australia, Italy, South Africa, Malaysia and India.

 

Image: Professor Graeme Johanson, Professor Don Schauder, Ms Jen Sullivan, Dr Kirsty Williamson and Dr Steve Wright 

07
Education
New structure to undergraduate program
Education

New structure to undergraduate program

The introduction of 'common core' units in all FIT undergraduate courses. Common core subjects are a set of units undertaken by all undergraduate students studying degrees with the Faculty of Information Technology. These units represented the fundamental body of knowledge that the Faculty believed all IT professionals required. These common core units, provided across all Monash IT degrees, would give students a solid foundation of IT skills so they could then confidently proceed to specialise in their area of interest. These common core units were recognised as an important part of the course structure.

07
Research
Productivity and innovation - Optimisation for travel and transport
Research

Productivity and innovation - Optimisation for travel and transport

The CTI-Monash Centre for Transport, Travel and Logistics (TTL) Optimization began as a research collaboration between the Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University and Constraint Technologies (CTI). The Centre focused on basic and applied research into techniques and technologies in support of CTI's Research Charter, particularly in areas such as scheduling and timetabling, asset utilization, staff rostering, operations optimization and disruption recovery.

Based in the Faculty of IT, the Centre was led by one of the faculty’s most prominent researchers, Professor Mark Wallace. During 2005-6 Prof. Wallace received two ARC Linkage Project grants to undertake projects on staff rostering and scheduling . Further collaboration was undertaken into optimization for TTL problems with other faculty researchers including Professor Geoff Webb, Dr Pramudi Suraweera and Mr Ranga Muhandiramge. Professor Wallace's research interests span different techniques and algorithms for optimisation and their integration and application to solving complex resource planning and scheduling problems. He is currently developing an optimisation platform in order to solve both research problems in public transport and commercial problems in freight logistics entitled 'Integrating Mobility on Demand in urban transport infrastructures'.

08
Research
MONADS PC Return
MONADS PC comes home to Caulfield
Research

MONADS PC Return

Dr. Judy Sheard and Prof. David Abramson welcome back the MONADS PC from the University of Ulm in Germany to Monash Museum of Computing History in December 2008.

08
Staff
Vice Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence
Some of our teaching staff were awarded a Commendation at the Vice Chancellor's Teaching Awards.
Staff

Vice Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence

Matthew Butler, Alan Dorin, Shane Moore, Mylini Munusam and, Sheelagh Walton were recognised with special commendation in the Vice Chancellor's Award for Teaching Excellence

08
Events/Highlights
FIT Staff and Students
Improvement in courses, engagement with industry and keeping abreast of new technologies boosted the Faculty's student numbers.
Events/Highlights

FIT Staff and Students

In 2008, the Faculty of Information Technology had over 200 staff (not including casual or sessional staff) and just over 3,000 students across five Australian and two international campuses. During the downturn of student numbers over the preceding few years, the Faculty of Information Technology made a number of improvements to its courses. Engagement with industry by both staff and students was recognised as vital, as well as keeping up with the most recent technologies was acknowledged as an important part of the faculties success.

08
Staff
MMCH recognises IT staff in new exhibition
Monash Museum of Computing History celebrate and exhibit the dedicated work of Professors Abramson and Rosenberg.
Staff

MMCH recognises IT staff in new exhibition

In 'recognition of computer scientists' Monash Museum of Computing History launch a new exhibition to highlight the work of Professors David Abramson and John Rosenberg. Both Professor Abramson and Professor Rosenberg started their academic careers at Monash University in the 1970s and devoted many years to developing Computing and Information Technology at Monash. Their biographies, which are outlined in the exhibition, feature their research, computing equipment and publications as well as photographic and text displays.

 

Image: Professors David Abramson and John Rosenberg.

08
Education
The Faculty embraces Industry Based Learning
Our students are offered places by world leading organisations as part of the Industry Based Learning Program.
Education

The Faculty embraces Industry Based Learning

The Industry Based Learning (IBL) program partners Monash University with leading global and Australian organisations to offer students outstanding placement opportunities and scholarships. IBL has been part of BIS/BBusSys/BBusIS since these courses commenced, but in 2008 it was also introduced to the Bachelor of Computer Science and Bachelor of Software Engineering and in 2009 to the Bachelor of Information Technology and Systems. In 2014 IBL was expanded to include international students. During their industry placements, students gain invaluable professional and business experience – giving them a competitive edge in the employment market. IBL is recognised as an important part of FIT education.

09
Research
Publication productivity in faculty recognised
Emeritus Professor David Arnott and Professor Ron Weber were recognised as having significant productivity in publications in the Asia Pacific Region.
Research

Publication productivity in faculty recognised

In 2009 the Pacific Asia Journal of the Association for Information Systems conducted a study examining the publication productivity of researchers in Information Systems with particular emphasis on the Pacific Asia region. Monash University had three researchers represented in the Asia Pacific Top 50, two of whom were from the Faculty of Information Technology: Professor David Arnott was equal 2nd (Equal 1st in Australia) and Professor Ron Weber - Dean of the Faculty of Information Technology was equal 7th.

 

Image:  Emeritus Professor David Arnott

09
Alumni & Friends
Whyte Memorial Lectures
The late philanthropic Emeritus Professor Jean Whyte and her sister Phyllis left generous bequests to Monash to enable continuing important research in the areas of record keeping and librarianship.
Alumni & Friends

Whyte Memorial Lectures

The Whyte Memorial Lecture is held annually to celebrate the legacy of the late Emeritus Professor Jean Whyte and her sister Phyllis whose generous bequests have enabled the Centre for Organisational and Social Informatics in the Faculty of IT to carry out important research. In 2009 the Whyte Memorial Lecture was introduced to celebrate the sisters' generous bequests and is held annually in their honour. Emeritus Professor W Boyd Rayward presented the inaugural lecture entitled 'When what is new is not: the information society in perspective.'

 

Image:  The late Emeritus Professor Jean Whyte.

09
Research
Visualising Angkor Wat; National Geographic exclusive
Animated 3D scenes from the Visualising Angkor Project feature on National Geographic to accompany a July 2009 National Geographic cover story on Angkor.
Research

Visualising Angkor Wat; National Geographic exclusive

The Visualising Angkor Project explores the historical recreation of the medieval Cambodian metropolis of Angkor through virtual, 3D technologies. The project is based upon the evidence-based creation of many individual 3D models, from trees to temples to walking figures. The 3D visualisations and 3D interactive scenes created by the Visualising Angkor Project draw upon a wide range of archaeological and historical data, from bas reliefs, architectural and textile studies, sculptural sources and botanical references gleaned from epigraphy to the extensive archaeological mapping carried out over the past 20 years and continuing today. Taken together, these many 3D models constitute a virtual library that can be patterned to envision hypothetical reconstructions drawn from historical texts and archaeological surveys. Such visualisations establish an iterative dialogue between 3D animators, archaeologists, and historians to test how assumptions about Angkor can be made more precise.

Since 2009, Tom Chandler has coordinated a small team of 3D modeling, 3D animation and computer game researchers (Brent McKee, Chandara Ung, Michael Lim, Mike Yeates and Elliott Wilson) on a research endeavor with significant impact across a range of major media outlets. The animated reconstructions of medieval Angkor have since been exhibited at the National Museum of Cambodia (2010) published online with the google cultural Institute (2013) and ABC Splash  (2014) Recently, a large-scale immersive simulation of crowds entering the Angkor Wat complex in the 12th century was previewed at the opening of sensiLab in the Caulfield Faculty of IT. These visualisations have also been published in research papers, book chapters, high school textbooks and televised documentaries In 2015, two 3D animations – Journey to Medieval Angkor Part I and Part II - and four navigable interactive 3D environments were licensed to ABC Digital Education as a teaching resource in the Australian High School Curriculum.

 

Image: Visualising Angkor, 2009; Courtesy of Dr Tom Chandler and the Angkor Wat Project Team

10
Events/Highlights
Professor David Abramson wins Vice-Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Innovation and External Collaboration
Professor David Abramson was awarded for his commitment to his research and engagement of his research with external partners.
Events/Highlights

Professor David Abramson wins Vice-Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Innovation and External Collaboration

Professor David Abramson was presented with the Vice-Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Innovation and External Collaboration at the recent 2010 Monash Research awards. The top Monash researchers and partners from industry and government met at the RACV Club in Melbourne for this event. 

Also, Professor Abramson has received the 2010 Faculty of Information Technology Award for Excellence in Innovation and External Collaboration.  This Faculty Award is designed specifically to reward excellence by researchers who have sought to progress their research, or to extend the outreach of their research, through engagement with external partner organisations including industry, government, and other not-for-profit sectors. 

 

Image: Professor David Abramson speaking at the awards.

10
Research
Monash Undergraduate Research Program Abroad (MURPA) wins USA Award
Professor David Abramson accepted an Innovations in Networking Award for the MURPA team project at the CENIC 2010 conference in San Diego.
Research

Monash Undergraduate Research Program Abroad (MURPA) wins USA Award

The Monash Undergraduate Research Projects Abroad (MURPA) program has received the 2010 Innovations in Networking Award for Enhancing Student Exchange Experiences with High Definition Video Conference. The award, made by the organising committee for the Corporation for Education network Initiatives in California (CENIC) 2010 conference, was accepted by Prof David Abramson. MURPA enables undergraduate students studying computer science, software engineering or related areas to undertake a summer semester international research project at the prestigious University of California, San Diego.

 

Image: MURPA award winners with David Abramson.

11
Alumni & Friends
Alumnus Kee Wong
Alumnus Kee Wong holds a BEng, a GradDipComp and an MBA from Monash. He is a Monash Fellow and holds a distinguished Alumni Award from the Faculty. He is an entreprenuer, businessman and managing director of a management and technology consulting company for e-business.
Alumni & Friends

Alumnus Kee Wong

Kee Wong

BEng 1986, GradDipComp 1989, MBA 1999

 

Entrepreneur Kee Wong is the founder and the Managing Director of e-Centric Innovations, a management and technology consulting company which provides strategic advice and systems integration services in e-business and IT. Following on from that success he founded and supported a number of businesses and today continues to invest in startups as well as established businesses in Australia, Malaysia, Singapore, China and the US.

He sits on a number of boards and advisory committees. He is the Chairman of the Board of the Australian Information Industry association and Deputy Chairman of Asialink. He is a member of the board of directors of Australian Services Roundtable, the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, and the National Gallery of Victoria. He is also an advisory board member of the Australia-Malaysia Institute, Monash University IT Faculty Board as well as a member of the Deakin University Business Leaders’ Group.

Kee Wong also volunteers with the Starlight Children’s Foundation as an ambassador for its IT Fund for Kids.

In 2011 he was made a Fellow of Monash University.

In 2014 he was awarded a Distinguished Alumni Award for the Faculty of IT.

 

Image: Courtesy of Kee Wong

11
Research
Founding of the Monash Country Lines Archive
Creation of the Monash Country Lines Archive to recereate the culture, history and langauge of our indigenous culture and heritage.
Research

Founding of the Monash Country Lines Archive

In February 2011, Dr Alan Finkel AM and Dr Elizabeth Finkel make a transformational gift through their foundation to help conserve Indigenous languages through the creation of the Monash Country Lines Archive (MCLA). The Monash Country Lines Archive (MCLA) is a collaborative Monash University project between the Monash Indigenous Centre (MIC), Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Information Technology (Tom Chandler, Brent McKee, Chandara Ung). The archive works with 3D animation as a method for intergenerational knowledge sharing, keeping language alive, and to reconnect language and it’s people. Through the development of partnerships with Indigenous communities across Australia, MCLA is using cutting edge 3D animation technologies to assist in the preservation of their knowledge and language. 

 

 

Image:  Song of the Tiger Shark at Manankurra; Courtesy of Tom Chandler and the Monash Country Lines team.

11
Alumni & Friends
Alumnus Beng Chin Ooi
Faculty alumnus Professor Beng Chin Ooi holds a Bachelor of Science and a PhD from Monash. He was awarded a distinguished ACM Fellow for his contributions to spatio-temporal and distributed management.
Alumni & Friends

Alumnus Beng Chin Ooi

Beng Chin Ooi

Bachelor of Science (1985) and a PhD (1989) entitled: Efficient Query Processing in a Geographic Information System.  

Beng Chin Ooi received an Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellowship for contributions to spatio-temporal and distributed data management.  In 2012 The IEEE Computer Society presented its Tsutomu Kanai Award to Beng Chin Ooi for pioneering research in distributed database management and peer-to-peer based enterprise quality management. 

 Beng Chin is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, past Dean of School of Computing and Director of Interactive Digital Media Institute at the National University of Singapore, and an adjunct Chang Jiang Professor at Zhejiang University. His work in distributes systems has resulted in important advances in data distribution and search and data management for peer to peer networks.  He has also made significant contributions to cloud computing and cloud based data management.

His research interests include database system architectures, performance issues, indexing techniques and query processing, in the context of multimedia, spatio-temporal, distributed/parallel/Peer-to-Peer/in-memory/cloud database systems and applications.

 

Image: Courtesy of Beg Chin Ooi

11
Events/Highlights
CORE Award for Professor David Abramson
Professor Abramson was awarded for his significant contributions to computing in Australia.
Events/Highlights

CORE Award for Professor David Abramson

Congratulations to Professor David Abramson who has been awarded the John Hughes Distinguished Service Award for 2011 by the Computing Research and Education Association of Australasia (CORE). CORE is an association of university departments of computer science in Australia and New Zealand. The award is for his contributions to high performance computing and his work on various national committees that have led to significant development of IT in Australia. 

Image: Professor Ron Weber (Dean of Faculty) presenting Professor Abramson with his award.

11
Education
New Learning Studios named after Monash innovator and pioneer; Chris Wallace
Newly refurbished computer teaching labs and learning spaces have been named after the late Professor Chris Wallace.
Education

New Learning Studios named after Monash innovator and pioneer; Chris Wallace

The late Professor Chris Wallace joined Monash University in 1968 as Foundation Professor and Chair of Information Science, retiring in 1996 when he was appointed Emeritus Professor.  In honour of his achievements in Information Sciences over his career, it seemed fitting to name the newly refurbished computer labs after him.

Professor Ron Weber, Dean of the Faculty of Information siad, “The new spaces will further enhance the facilities our students can access, giving them the best opportunity to succeed in their chosen courses.”

Professor Wallace will be remebered for leaving the leagacies of the Wallace multiplier, an algorithm for fast multiplication that is used in many types of pocket calculators and for developing the Minimum Message Length, a theory of machine learning and statistics, which informs current research into a number of fields, including data mining and artificial intelligence.

The refurbishment of the computer labs was led by Dr John Betts, Associate Head of School Clayton School of IT and Jeanette Niehus, School Manager.

 

Image:  The late Professor Chris Wallace

12
Alumni & Friends
Alumnus Luke Sayers
Faculty alumnus Luke Sayers holds a Bachelor of Business / Bachelor of Computing (Information Systems) double degree from Monash. He is CEO of Pricewaterhouse Cooper's Australia and Asia Pacific and leads a strong group of partners in the company.
Alumni & Friends

Alumnus Luke Sayers

Luke Sayers

Bachelor of Business / Bachelor of Computing (Information Systems) 1993

 

Luke Sayers is appointed as CEO of PwC Australia.

Luke  joined PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwCs) Assurance practice in 1993, and since then has worked with the firm in Australia and internationally across all service lines: Assurance, Tax and Advisory. He was admitted as a partner in the US in 2000, and returned to Australia as a Partner in 2001. Luke has served on the firm's leadership team for the past eight years and since July 2010 has held the role of National Managing Partner.

Under Luke's leadership PwC Australia is focused on delivering value to clients, lending expertise to help address important national issues, and contributing to communities around Australia. In addition, Luke has a long term commitment to community organisations and external Boards. He is currently on the Board of Special Olympics Australia, the Carlton Football Club, The Global Foundation, and the Australian Business and Community Network, where he is also Chair of the Melbourne Chapter.

 

Image: Courtesy of Luke Sayers

12
Research
Eureka Awards; Nodal Music Composition Software
John McCormack was part of a Monash team who won the 2012 Eureka award for their innovative music composition software called Nodal.
Research

Eureka Awards; Nodal Music Composition Software

In 2012 Monash University Faculty of IT staff were recognised in the Australian Museum Eureka Awards which acknowledges excellence in the fields of research and innovation. The 2012 Australia Eureka Prize for Innovation in Computer Science was awarded to the Faculty's Associate Professor Alan Dorin, Associate Professor Jon McCormack and Aidan Lane from the University's Centre for Electronic Media Art (CEMA) and Peter McIlwain from Sonic Design for their music composition software, Nodal. Nodal is generative software for composing music, interactive real-time improvisation as well as a musical tool for experimentation and fun. The software was launched on Apple’s App Store in May 2011 and quickly shot to number two in sales in the music category, an indication of the interest generated by this revolutionary composing tool.

 

Image: Screen shot of Nodal Music Composition Software.

12
Events/Highlights
IEEE Technical Committee on Scalable Computing Award (TCSC); Professor David Abramson
Professor David Abramson wins prestigious IEEE Scalable Computing award for his contributions to research in this area.
Events/Highlights

IEEE Technical Committee on Scalable Computing Award (TCSC); Professor David Abramson

Professor David Abramson has won the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Technical Committee on Scalable Computing (TCSC) Award for Excellence in Scalable Computing. The award was presented at an IEEE international symposium in Ottawa, Canada. Dr Abramson presented a keynote speech at the conference on cluster, cloud and grid computing.

The medal was awarded for Dr Abramson's significant and sustained contributions to the scalable computing community, and his outstanding record of high-quality and high-impact research.

 

Image: Professor David Abramson

12
Research
NICTA Lab Caulfield Established
The National Information and Communications Technology Australia lab opened at Caulfield to enhance our collaborative research work in the areas of optimisation and machie learning.
Research

NICTA Lab Caulfield Established

National Information and Communications Technology Australia (NICTA) is the nation’s largest organisation dedicated to ICT research.  Research within this Centre of Excellence spans five large scale areas of expertise:  Machine Learning, Computer Vision, Mobile Systems, Optimisation and Software Systems. NICTA aims to harness research expertise with industry initiatives for national benefit and wealth of Australia.

In 2012 Monash University joined National ICT Australia (NICTA) and created the Monash NICTA laboratory at its Caulfield campus. The main areas of interest at the Caulfield lab are Machine Learning and Optimisation.  We currently have 18 PhD students on NICTA scholarships, 4 NICTA research staff are housed in the lab and about 20 Monash researchers from the Faculties of Engineering, Science and Information Technology are involved in collaborative projects with NICTA.

13
Alumni & Friends
Alumna Suja Chandrasekaran
Faculty Alumna Suja Chandrasekaran holds a Master of Business Systems from Monash and is one of the Top 10 Digital and Technology Leaders in the US.
Alumni & Friends

Alumna Suja Chandrasekaran

Suja Chandrasekaran

Master of Business Systems 1996

Suja has worked for some of the world's greatest organisations across Australia, Latin America, Europe and the US. Today, she is an influential and global change-agent in digital, technology, data, analytics and business process.

Suja currently leads global technology, data and analytics platforms for Walmart US, Sam's Club and Walmart International. Walmart is the Fortune 1 Company and the world's largest retailer with revenues of about USD 475 billion.

But Suja is passionate about more than being one of the world's most respected 'deep technologists'. She is committed to driving change for female executives.

Suja supports Asian Women Leadership and leads several platforms to help develop women in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines as well as coaching Chief Executive Officers of technology start-ups in Silicon Valley, advising on digital marketing, ecommerce, mobility and analytics strategies.

In 2013 Suja was awarded 'IT Leader of the Year' by Temple University's Fox School of Business and was named as one of the 'Top 10 Digital and Technology Leaders' in the US by the Financial Times.

 

Image: Courtesy of Suja Chandrasekaran

13
Staff
Frieder Seible; Fourth Dean of the Faculty of IT
Staff

Frieder Seible; Fourth Dean of the Faculty of IT

In late 2012, Professor Ron Weber retired as Dean of the Faculty and joined Monash South Africa as its third Pro Vice-Chancellor. At the beginning of 2013, Professor Frieder Seible, respected engineering researcher and university administrator, commenced as the new Dean of the Faculties of Engineering and Information Technology. Professor Seible was also appointed as an Academic Vice-President of the University. Professor Seible responsibilities include strategic planning and operation, faculty-wide research and education initiatives, academic affairs and Monash-wide cooperative programs. Professor Seible is known internationally as a bridge designer and engineer but also credited with building metaphorical bridges between different disciplines of engineering, between different academic faculties and between industry and academia. As Vice-President (Academic) he is responsible for a range of external and internal engagement initiatives at Monash, including the Monash Industry Council of Advisers, the Monash Industry Partnership Program and the Monash Industry Team Initiative.

Image: Professor Frieder Sieble, Dean of Faculty of Information Technology

 

13
Alumni & Friends
Shaila Pervin
Alumna Shaila Pervin, now working at IBM as a Postdoctoral Researcher developed the beatObox app controlled by gesture control-all from the wrist.
Alumni & Friends

Shaila Pervin

Shaila Pervin completed her PhD in Query Processing over Distributed Wireless Sensor Networks at Monash University in 2013 under the supervision of Dr. Joarder Kamruzzaman and Dr. Gour Karmakar. 'The Faculty of IT at Monash helped me to pursue interests and to secure a role at IBM! I participated in the 1st Innovation Showcase in 2013 which is where I met the Director of the IBM Research Lab.' Shaila is now a Postdoctoral Researcher at IBM Research Australia in the Social Media Research Team specialising in information visualisation. Shaila Pervin, and her husband Saikat Islam, also made it into the top 40 for in the Samsung Gear App Challenge 2014 for their ‘beatObox’ app and received $10,000 prize money. 'beatObox' allows you to control the volume and song tracks using gesture control, use equaliser features and view and select songs from playlists – all from your wrist.

 

Image: Screenshot of beatObox app.

13
Events/Highlights
Information Technology Innovation Showcase
Events/Highlights

Information Technology Innovation Showcase

In late 2013 the Faculty held a showcase of the most innovative and impact-based research accomplishments of its PhD students at ACMI, Federation Square. The Faculty's Innovation Day attracted significant interest from industry and other organisations, providing an opportunity for the guests to engage with the 20 selected students about their PhD research. It also provided students with an opportunity to develop and grow relationships with industry and the wider community.

An independent panel of industry judges; Judith Bennett (Business 4Group), Luke Visser (Agilent Technologies), Patrick Maes (ANZ) and Richard Ferrers (ANDS) selected the best of the PhD poster presentations which was awarded to Eranda Lakshantha from Monash University Malaysia for his research on Intuitive Human Robot Interaction with Augmented Reality.

 

Image: Winner; Eranda Lakshantha from Monash University Malaysia's School of Information Technology

13
Staff
Prof. Frada Burstein recognised for her work in ICT education
Staff

Prof. Frada Burstein recognised for her work in ICT education

In mid 2013, Professor Frada Burstein was named the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Educator of the Year for her work in ICT education. The award is given to Australian educators who have demonstrated excellence in ICT education and shown exceptional outcomes for students as well as employers. In the same year Prof Burstein was also named as a Fellow of the Australian Computer Society (ACS) for her distinguished contributions to ICT research in the field of knowledge management and real-time decision support systems. She was nominated by Emeritus Professor David Arnott, who employed Burstein when she first started at Monash Caulfield in the early 1990s.

Prof. Burstein is also part of the COSI research team for the Breast Cancer Knowledge Online (BCKO) 2002-5. The team was supported by industry partners BreastCare Victoria and the Breast Cancer Action Group and by an ARC grant. Commencing in 2002, the first stage of the project was completed in 2003. Phase 2 of the project, entitled BCKO2, was successfully completed by 2005. The finished website is a gateway to breast cancer information. This portal is the combined work of women with breast cancer and the team of Monash University researchers.

Image:  Professor Frada Burstein with the Minister for Technology and Assistant Treasurer of Victoria, Gordon Rich-Phillips.

14
Alumni & Friends
Alumnus Owen Kerr
Faculty alumnus Owen Kerr holds a Bachelor of Business Systems from Monash and is CEO if his co-founded company Pepperstone which specialises in foreign exchange trading.
Alumni & Friends

Alumnus Owen Kerr

Owen Kerr

Bachelor of Business Systems (2005)

Owen Kerr wins 2014 Australian EY Entrepreneur Of The Year award

Owen Kerr co-founded the online foreign exchange broker Pepperstone in 2010 which today services more than 20,000 retail investors in more than 150 countries with an average daily trading volume of more than US $3.3 billion.

The company is among the top 15 retail foreign exchange brokers globally and currently has offices in Australia, China and the United States, offering trading in 68 currency pairs and metals.

 

Image: Courtesy of Owen Kerr

14
Education
Alexandria Education Resource Repository
Alexandria is an educational repository to facilitate authoring, sharing discovery and publishing of high quality, interactive, media-rich, 'learning modules and ebooks'. this repository not only enhances the learning and teaching experience whilst reducing time and cost.
Education

Alexandria Education Resource Repository

Alexandria is a learning objects repository for the collaborative development of coursework resources which enables educators at Monash and beyond to co-develop and share learning and teaching resources. Alexandria supports the authoring of high quality, interactive teaching materials incorporating all modern media types. It delivers these materials as fully independent eBooks and on the web. 

The project is developed by Prof. Bernd Meyer's team in the Faculty of IT to facilitate a path to better and simultaneously more efficient teaching, in short to raise the quality of education while reducing its cost. It was originally conceived with dual purposes: to support the introduction of blended learning and flipped classrooms at Monash and as a platform for collaboration in the broader open education community. It continues to serve both purposes across several faculties at Monash and in FIT's education outreach.

Alexandria is the centrepiece of the Education Technology Lab, headed by Aidan Lane. It presently serves more than 9000 students and more than 150 academic authors in four faculties across Monash. It also forms the corner stone of several external activities, including the development of new curriculum for the VCE and for the IT Abu Dhabi.

 

 

14
Alumni & Friends
Alumnus Dion Weisler
Faculty Alumnus Dion Weisler holds a BComp (Info Sys) from Monash and has recently been appointed president and chief executive officer of Hewlett Packard Inc., Hewlett Packard’s new personal systems and printing company.
Alumni & Friends

Alumnus Dion Weisler

Dion Weisler

BComp (Info Sys) 1990

Dion Weisler has more than 23 years’ experience in the IT and telecommunications sector, having held numerous key executive positions across multiple countries.

Mr Weisler has been appointed president and chief executive officer of Hewlett Packard Inc., Hewlett Packard’s new personal systems and printing company.

Prior to holding the role of Executive Vice President of Hewlett Packard’s (HP) Printing and Personal Systems organisation at HP, he served as the company’s senior vice-president and managing director of printing and personal systems in Asia Pacific and Japan. Before joining HP, he was the vice-president and chief operating officer of Lenovo's product and mobile internet digital home groups. He was also the general manager of Korea, ASEAN and ANZ where he was responsible for Lenovo's complete business in these markets. Prior to working with Lenovo, Mr Weisler was a general manager at Telstra, responsible for the conferencing and collaboration products and services division. He also had a successful 11-year career at Acer, where he was the managing director of Acer UK and managing director of Central and Eastern Europe.

 

 

Image: Courtesy of Dion Weisler

14
Research
Dr. Joanne Evans is awarded Future Fellowship
Research

Dr. Joanne Evans is awarded Future Fellowship

Dr Joanne Evans, a senior lecturer in the Faculty of IT received an ARC Future Fellowship in 2014 for her project - Connecting the Disconnected: Designing Socially Inclusive, Integrated, Archival and Recordkeeping Systems and Services. Archives and records are the memory banks of healthy organisations, governments, communities and societies. This Fellowship aims to address systemic failings of recordkeeping and archival systems to meet the identity, memory and accountability needs of individuals and communities in crisis. It will look to pioneer a new participatory methodology for archival design to deliver sustainable, dynamic, and integrated archival and recordkeeping systems. It will be developed through the co-design of an integrated archival access network for reconstructing identity and a life story archive system for children currently in care. This research aims to transform evidence and memory management systems into information infrastructure that better protects and respects human rights. 

 

Image: Dr Joanne Evans

14
Events/Highlights
Opening of CAVE2™ Immersive visualisation platform
The Monash CAVE2 Pilot Project Grant 2015, sponsored by the Monash Immersive Visualisation Platform (MIVP), has also been launched to enable researchers to utilise the facility and enhance their work.
Events/Highlights

Opening of CAVE2™ Immersive visualisation platform

On 5 May 2014 CAVE2™ , the world’s most advanced research visualisation facility, was officially opened by Chief Scientist, Professor Ian Chubb AC. CAVE2™ combines extraordinary hardware and software technologies to render complex data and geometry at very high resolution in a physical space that puts the observer right in the middle of the whole experience. The facility gives researchers a near seamless, 320 degree, panoramic virtual environment at ultra-high resolution, contrast and clarity. The aim is to accelerate research discoveries by visualising data in new ways and is being used by many of the faculties. FIT is one of the CAVE2™ partners and  'Angkor - A Medieval Metropolis' showreel by Tom Chandler and Brent McKee is one of the current available examples to experience CAVE2™ in action.

Image: CAVE2™ Monash University (CAVE2™ is a trademark of the University of Illinois Board of Trust)

14
Research
New Centre for Data Science
Showcase projects within the Centre include: Fog forecasting, Ann Nicholson; Forecasting series of high-dimensional heterogeneous spatio-temporal series, Geof Webb; Big Data analytics: The diabetes Screening of Multivariate Data-Driven Decision Guidance for Clinical Scientists, Frada Burstein with many collaborators; Intelligent text mining for improved surgical audit outcomes, Frada Burstein
Research

New Centre for Data Science

At the end of 2013 the Centre for Data Science was established to bring together researchers interested in the areas of data analytics, data systems, data governance, management and archiving. The exponential growth in available data from so many sources has highlighted the requirement for different methods and technologies to process, analyse and archive this data, as well as data security. The Centre for Data Science aims to achieve this by its multidisciplinary focus and collaboration with government, communities and other higher education establishments both nationally and internationally. Professor Geoff Webb is the Centre Director and was presented with the 2013 Outstanding Service award at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) - International conference on Data Mining for his contributions in the field. In 2014 he was awarded an ARC Discovery Outstanding Research Award and made an IEEE Fellow in 2015.

 

Image: Professor Geoff Webb, Centre Director 

14
Research
New Bachelor of Informatics and Computation Advanced (Honours)
The new Bachelor of Informatics and Computation Advanced (Honours) course gives students a more 'hands-on' practical reseach approach to study from the start.
Research

New Bachelor of Informatics and Computation Advanced (Honours)

In 2014 the Faculty launched the Bachelor of Informatics and Computation Advanced (Honours), a flexible new course designed for high achieving students with a research focus, that is, those who wish to pursue postgraduate study or employment requiring research and advanced IT development skills.

The course features a stream of hands on, project-based work that gives students the opportunity to be involved in research right from the start through to the completion of the degree. In particular, in the third year of the course the students are required to undertake a 22 week placement in a research group of a participating organisation. The work performed during this placement is structured and assessed as part of the degree. In the fourth year the students undertake a substantial individual research project.

Graduating with Honours will not only enhance the employment opportunities of our students – it also means they can complete a Masters in just one additional year, and provides them with an excellent preparation for a PhD program.

 

 

14
Staff
25 Years of Service for our Professional Staff
Congratulations! 25 Years of Service at Monash.
Staff

25 Years of Service for our Professional Staff

Congratulations go to some of our professional staff who were awarded Monash medals for 25 years of service at Monash at a special ceremony.

 

Image:  From left to right: Duke Fonias (ICT Co-ordinator), Denyse Cove (Administrative Assistant) and Michelle Ketchen with Assistant Dean of Faculty, Maria Garcia de la Banda.

14
Education
Prato Italy; Faculty launches new interdisciplinary unit
The Faculty establishes a new 'Creative computing' interdisciplinary unit in Prato, Italy
Education

Prato Italy; Faculty launches new interdisciplinary unit

The Monash Prato Centre is located in the town of Prato, just outside Florence in the Tuscany region of Italy, and provides Monash with a strategic European base for education and research collaborations. Since its establishment in 2001, thousands of Monash students and researchers have benefited from the Centre’s strong links throughout Europe.

In 2014 the Faculty launched the unit "Creative computing: Understanding Art, Science and Technology" at Prato. This unit explores developments in art, science and technology, drawing on Italian history and culture as a background for understanding contemporary interdisciplinary practice. It examines the nature and development of technology in science, engineering, the arts and architecture. Using the city of Prato and the museums, galleries, rural landscapes and built environments in the region, students develop team-based interdisciplinary projects drawing on this rich history.

 

Image: Monash Prato Centre near florence, Italy

15
Events/Highlights
Creation of sensiLab; New Innovation Hub
A new model of research for the 21st Century.
Events/Highlights

Creation of sensiLab; New Innovation Hub

Located at the Monash Caulfield campus, sensiLab is a new-concept research hub that inspires researchers to initiate change rather than to simply respond to it.  Director, Professor Jon McCormack is an award-winning researcher in the Faculty and he aims to bring a culture of innovation and discovery with this new venture.  sensiLab is a response to an era where new knowledge is being generated faster than at any other time in human history, and where disruptive technology continues to challenge long-established businesses and institutions. sensiLab will help the Faculty embrace these changes by adapting its research culture over the next decade. Rather than targeting a single discipline or application area, sensiLab will adopt an agile, collaborative approach bringing together researchers from IT, Art Design and Architecture, Engineering, and Business and Economics to work in ‘anti-disciplinary’ teams to perform research that cannot be performed by a single discipline alone.  The lab will potentially become an attractive investment for industry and business for years to come, allowing industry partners and alumni to further their own projects in collaboration with established Monash academics.

 

Image: Professor Jon McCormack, Director of sensiLab

15
Education
Short Course in Data Science
Monash will run a short course in Data Science to give practitioners in industry an understanding of how to use data for effective business decision making.
Education

Short Course in Data Science

The impact of Data Science on modern business is second only to the introduction of computers. It has become standard for businesses to retain and collect large volumes of data far beyond what is necessary for their day-to-day operations and derive value, often predictive, by subjecting it to advanced analytics: from risk analysis to consumer-behaviour modelling; from churn prediction to optimisation of customer incentives. Also emerging are intra-organisational applications and uses, such as in The Internet of Things: Big Data analytics over telemetry data from industrial appliances and networked devices (e.g., smart meters) are now used in every vertical, from manufacturing to mining, from transportation to health, from energy to cyber-security. Wherever a digital footprint can be created, data is gathered and analysed in order to model behaviours, understand causes and effects, predict the future and allow decision optimisation for profit maximisation and cost minimisation, which is why even small and medium businesses today are accumulating Big Data and experimenting with cloud-based data analytics, and why this data is proving vital for creating and maintaining their competitive advantages. 

Combine this explosion in Big Data with a shortfall in skills: not only competent and knowledgeable data scientists to derive the insights but also, and in larger quantities, managers skilled in plugging analytics into the business process and turning statistical insights into business value. Associate Professor Michael Brand within the Faculty, together with colleagues and industry experts, has developed a new course to address this knowledge gap.  The course is an intensive 24 hours over a 3 day period focussed on the needs of professionals in managerial positions in the data-driven world.  Drawing on Monash’s world-leading expertise, the experience of industry-leading practitioners and real-world case studies, the course is designed to give professionals an understanding regarding where data relevant to decision-making can be found, how it can be harnessed, what wrangling is required to make it usable and how predictive or prescriptive models can be generated from it.

15
Research
PROTIC: Oxfam Bangladesh Project
A $3.8 million donation from the Empowerment Charitable Trust allows Monash researchers to launch a project which allows over 20,000 farmers in Bangladesh access to mobile information technology
Research

PROTIC: Oxfam Bangladesh Project

The PROTIC-Oxfam Bangladesh project was launched on the 7th June 2015 in Dhaka in the presence of Australian and Bangladeshi dignitaries and the Dean of the Faculty, Professor Sieble.    A $3.86 million donation from the Empowerment Charitable Trust will fund a system that farmers in isolated regions in the north and southwest of Bangladesh, who currently have limited access to information, can use for answers to their agricultural issues.  The aim is to give poorer communities in Bangladesh the opportunity to move towards economic stability and self-empowerment. 

Dr Stillman, lead researcher, said that “although Bangladesh is a poor nation, they have a sophisticated mobile network with a high proportion of the population, including women, owning or having access to a mobile phone”.  The goal of the project is to establish a two-way interactive text/voice system.

The information system will provide time-critical information in response to the needs of Bangladeshi rural populations, focussing on such issues as  fish farming and animal husbandry, produce marketing, and water and weather information.   Due to limited literacy, voice and visual interactivity is an essential part of the system. This project promotes community involvement; particularly women. Oxfam Bangladesh have identified two local partners to engage with the local communities in Rangpur Division in the north, and Rangpur Division in the south.  The chosen areas have isolated communities that are extremely poor and face issues of environmental degradation and food insecurity.

 

 

Image:  Oxfam-Bangladesh. Courtesy of Tapa Ranjan Chakraborty, Program Officer (Partnership)

15
Education
New VCE Algorithmics Subject Launched
VCE Algorithmics is a new computing subject at tertiary level for high achieving secondary students and is fullyscored and credited to give students a head start at university.
Education

New VCE Algorithmics Subject Launched

In 2015 Monash University together with The University of Melbourne and the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) designed and implemented a revolutionary new computing subject for the upper secondary school curriculum.  This new study in the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE), titled "Algorithmics", is a first in several regards:

- VCE Algorithmics represents a radical departure from what is normally taught as IT in school curricula. Its focus is on 'algorithmic thinking’ rather than on coding.  Algorithmics covers systematic methods for analysing real world problems, identifying their salient aspects to model, and solving them using rigorously structured procedures. It explores the design of algorithms as a powerful approach to sound reasoning about structured information. Algorithmics conveys the conceptual landscape of computer science, but its appeal is much broader than this: with its emphasis on algorithmic thinking it is of benefit to students of all disciplines that rely on structured logical reasoning. 

- VCE Algorithmics is the first study in a new schema to support high achieving secondary students. It allows them early access to tertiary materials in the context of their normal studies. While being fully scored study for ATAR purposes it additionally attracts university credit, giving successful students a head start at university.

- VCE Algorithmics was specifically designed to have no gender bias. As it radically moves away from the often-found preoccupation with “wrangling the machine” and focuses on the underlying conceptual aspects and theory, it has great potential for engaging girls. 

More than 100 students participated in the first delivery of the unit in 2015. This first delivery saw more than 30% female participation, more than three times the proportion found in normal Software Development studies at this level.

15
Education
Prato Italy; Faculty launches two new interdisciplinary units
The Faculty have introduced another two new interdisciplinary units for 2015 at Monash's Prato Centre, Italy.
Education

Prato Italy; Faculty launches two new interdisciplinary units

After the success of the new 'Creative Computuing' unit in Prato in 2014, the Faculty introduced two new units to enhance our portfolio of interdisciplinary study.

The 'Community Informatics' unit draws heavily on local Italian expertise and case studies, such as the use of social media by community activists after the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake.  Students will learn how to assist communities to develop information and IT policy and strategy frameworks, to build community IT and Information Knowledge Management in, for example, healthcare, education and governance. 

The 'Heritage Informatics' unit makes good use of the local cultural heritage in Prato and of a collaborative workshop hosted by Florence University’s Heritage VAST-Lab, which is situated at its Prato campus.  The unit brings a cross-disciplinary approach to the challenges of managing cultural information.  Students will study key technologies such as mobile data, digital mapping and storytelling, 3D and augmented reality.

 

15
Staff
Chris Gonsalvez: New Associate Dean Student Engagement
Our first Associate Dean Student Engagement, Chris Gonsalvez is appointed to ensure an outstanding experience for students beyond the core Information Technology curriculum.
Staff

Chris Gonsalvez: New Associate Dean Student Engagement

In 2015, Chris Gonsalvez, took on the role of Associate Dean Student Engagement - a first for the Faculty of IT and Monash.  Chris started as an academic in 1985 and has held a variety of positions including Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Course Director, Associate Head of School and Director of Industry and Community Engagement. She has won a number of awards including the Faculty Award and Vice Chancellor Special Commendation for Programs that Enhance Learning. 

In her role as Associate Dean Student Engagement, Chris helps ensure an outstanding experience for students beyond the formal curriculum.  A key aspect of the role is cultivating strong industry and alumni engagement to enhance our students' education with a range of programs such as our Industry Based Learning Program, which assist in the building students' work readiness skills.  

 

Image: Chris Gonsalvez. Associate Dean of Student Engagement

15
Events/Highlights
Ferranti-Sirius Computer Display; Monash Computer Museum
The Ferranti-Sirius computer was the first computer to be purchased by Monash in 1962. It is now housed in the Museum of Computer History at the Caulfield Campus.
Events/Highlights

Ferranti-Sirius Computer Display; Monash Computer Museum

Monash purchased the Ferranti-Sirius computer in 1962; their first computer.  Professor Cliff Bellamy arrived from Ferranti with the computer to help set it up and train staff on it.  He remained at Monash untill he retired in 1996.  He was instrumental in establishing and managing the Computer Centre at Monash. Today the Ferranti-Sirius computer sits on display in the Computing Museum at the Caulfield Campus.

 

Image: THE FERRANTI SIRIUS COMPUTER
The Ferranti Sirius on display at the Museum. MMoCH Collection 2007.0304.

15
Events/Highlights
25 Years of IT at Monash Gala Dinner
The dinner, held at Melbourne's Docklands Peninsula Room, showcased the significant contributions made by the Faculty to the industry, through its strong partnerships and relations with industry, communities and alumni.
Events/Highlights

25 Years of IT at Monash Gala Dinner

Dean of the Faculty of IT, Professor Frieder Seible, with Vice Chancellor, Professor Margaret Gardner AO and Master of Ceremonies, radio and TV presenter Marc Fennell, host a Gala Dinner to celebrate the 25th birthday of the Faculty. The dinner, held at Melbourne's Docklands Peninsula Room, showcased the significant contributions made by the Faculty to the industry, through its strong partnerships and relations with industry, communities and alumni.

The short film captures the journey from 1990 through to today, and was screened at the dinner.

            

15
Events/Highlights
Celebrating Milestones: the 2015 Whyte Memorial Lecture
Over 100 IT and librarianship professionals attended the annual Whyte Memorial Lecture held this year at the RACV Club in Melbourne. The Monash Faculty of IT was honoured to welcome Professor Ross Harvey as this year’s presenter at the 2015 Whyte Memorial Lecture held on 15 September.
Events/Highlights

Celebrating Milestones: the 2015 Whyte Memorial Lecture

The Monash Faculty of IT was honoured to welcome Professor Ross Harvey as this year’s presenter at the 2015 Whyte Memorial Lecture held on 15 September. A renowned expert in preservation and newspaper history, Professor Harvey provided a thought-provoking address on best-practice in retaining, saving and archiving in the new digital world.

This special annual event celebrates the legacy of the late Jean Whyte and her sister Phyllis. Jean was the foundation professor in the Graduate School of Librarianship at Monash University. She and her sister Phyllis left generous bequests to Monash to support research in librarianship, records and archives. Their legacies also support the library's collections in English literature, librarianship and philosophy.

Deputy Dean of the Faculty of IT, Professor Maria Garcia de la Banda, said that although the faculty looks forward to the event every year, this year’s was particularly special.

“This 2015 event coincided with our faculty’s 25 year anniversary. It also marks 40 years of library and information studies teaching and research at Monash – and 40 years since the appointment of Professor Jean Whyte as the foundation chair in the Graduate School of Librarianship in 1975,” said Professor Garcia de la Banda.

 

Image: (Left to right) Professor John Crossley, Maria Garcia de la Banda - Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Information Technology, Professor Ross Harvey, Dr Brian McMullin

15
Education
Young ICT Explorers Melbourne
Students from the John Monash Science School clinched the winning spots in this year's Young ICT Explorers Melbourne competition, sponsored by the Faculty of IT.
Education

Young ICT Explorers Melbourne

The Young ICT Explorers (YICTE) Melbourne was this year sponsored by Monash University’s Faculty of IT, and organised by Digital Careers. The judging event was held at the Caulfield campus on the 29th of August with more than 120 students showcasing some amazing projects.

The competition was a huge success with twice the number of schools competing, two and a half times the number of projects and almost three times the number of students attending compared to last year. The winners of the Year 9 – 10 and Year 11 – 12 categories were all from the John Monash Science School. Alex Socha took the top spot in the Year 9 – 10 category for his project, The Lucky Block Minecraft, while in the Year 11 – 12 category, Dylan Sanusi-Goh, Anirudh Mittal, Ethan Payne and Pavel Zakopaylo clinched the first place with their project, Sensoring JMSS. Two students from that team were actually funded by the Faculty to represent Monash at SC14, an international conference for high performance computing, networking, storage and analysis, and this was where the project started to take form.

 

Image: Dylan Sanusi-Goh, Anirudh Mittal, Ethan Payne and Pavel Zakopaylo all John Monash Science School

15
Alumni & Friends
Computer Science Honours 1975 Class-40 Year Reunion!
The class of 1975- Computer Science BSc(Hons) celebrated their 40 year reunion with a tour of the Monash Museum of Computing History, a tour of the SensiLab at Caulfield and afternoon tea at Clayton campus.
Alumni & Friends

Computer Science Honours 1975 Class-40 Year Reunion!

Recently, a highly motivated group Monash IT Alumni managed to pull together a reunion of the 1975 Computer Science Honours class. They were drawn together again by the desire to renew connections and find out about what they had each been doing with their careers and lives. Another driver was their thirst to see just what was happening in Monash’s Faculty of IT (particularly Computer Science) today.

This was supported by Professor Graham Farr: "the idea and impetus for this 40-year reunion came from them, not us, but of course we responded with great enthusiasm and provided a fair bit of assistance with the event."

In 1975 the BSc (Hons) - Computer Science degree was under the Faculty of Science (when Clayton was the only Monash campus). Since 1990, Computer Science has been housed in the Faculty of IT.

The reunion was attended by 11 Alumni from the class of 1975 (which was 15 in total), boasting a participation rate of 73%, which is an exceptional turn-out after 40 years.

Professor Farr went on to say he felt the 1975 BSc (Hons) - Computer Science group were special as they were a very bright group at a time when the discipline was very young, had a wonderful esprit de corps, and boasted a high level of interaction with academic staff. "A number of the Alumni have gone on to be successful in a variety of activities: academic leadership (John Rosenberg became Dean of FIT), research (Stephen Westfold in Silicon Valley, and John Rosenberg too of course), poetry and puzzle composition (Greg Shalless), photography (John Heaton), wine industry (Artemis Georgiadis), as well as general management, consultancy, and many different IT roles."

As part of its ongoing commitment to developing its Alumni networks, the Faculty of IT assisted the Alumni in organising their reunion, including providing a tour of the Monash Museum of Computing History and the new SensiLab. The group enjoyed an afternoon tea at the Faculty of IT’s Clayton campus where they met some current staff and research students.

 

Image: The Class of '75 -BSc (Hons) Computer Science

16
Research
Innovation in elder-care on the horizon
Professor Ingrid Zukerman from Monash University and her team are working on a non-intrusive home monitoring device, which sends out alerts to carers in the case of abnormally long periods of inactivity.
Research

Innovation in elder-care on the horizon

When it comes to senior citizens, it can difficult to strike a balance between maintaining an independent lifestyle and ensuring that help will be there when needed. Mobile phones aren’t always within reach, and in some instances elderly people can find themselves lying on the floor, alone, injured and unable to get back on their feet. Professor Ingrid Zukerman from Monash University and her team are working on a non-intrusive home monitoring device, which sends out alerts to carers in the case of abnormally long periods of inactivity.

Housed in small boxes, the monitoring devices detect motion, vibration, light and temperature amongst other things, and are designed to be plugged into power points in the most-often used areas of the house. The system is also designed to be unobtrusive, and doesn’t require cameras to be installed or the user to wear or carry around a device.

One of the challenges facing Professor Zukerman and her colleagues, Associate Professor Andy Russell, Dr Masud Moshtaghi and Dr Kai Zhan, is finding a balance between delays in identifying lengthy periods of inactivity and the frequency of false alerts.

”Typically, shorter waiting times imply more false alerts and vice versa. To alleviate the false alert problem, we plan to implement an interim step, where the system could ask the person being monitored to wave if they’re okay. This would activate a motion detector, and avoid sending a false alarm to a carer. If, however, the system was unable to detect a response for some time, an alert would be sent - first to a carer and perhaps then to a medical service,” Professor Zukerman said.

The project may also have broader applications outside of private homes. St Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney and Melbourne and the aged-care facilities Vasey RSL Care and Old Colonists have all expressed interest in the research. According to Associate Professor Steven Faux, Director of Rehabilitation and Pain Medicine at St Vincent’s Hospital Sydney, monitoring the movements of patients in nursing homes and hospital rooms would be of great benefit to protect the patients' safety.

“Currently, we rely on passing staff members to discover patients or residents after they have experienced an incident. The value of the sensors is that the movements can be detected without affecting a patient’s privacy, allowing staff to monitor movement and potentially dangerous situations,” Professor Steven Faux said.

Professor Zukerman received a grant from the Australian Research Council (ARC) to undertake modelling of the daily habits of seniors, and develop algorithms that detect changes due to functional decline or the onset of illness, in addition to instantaneous events, such as falls, which the monitoring system is already capable of detecting. She also hopes to determine whether and how best to communicate with seniors and carers to deliver information and alerts, testing the effectiveness and acceptance of the new technologies with a diverse population of seniors and carers.

16
Staff
Monash University Data Scientist wins Victorian Young Achiever Award
Dr François Petitjean, from the Faculty of Information Technology won this year’s Victorian Young Achiever Award in the Research Impact category.
Staff

Monash University Data Scientist wins Victorian Young Achiever Award

Dr François Petitjean, from the Faculty of Information Technology at Monash University, is the winner of this year’s Victorian Young Achiever Award in the Research Impact category.

Dr Petitjean, whose work is partly funded by the US Air Force, has developed systems which are being applied across a range of scientific disciplines, from monitoring oil spills to fighting insect-borne diseases.

"I am delighted and honoured to receive this award,” said Dr Petitjean. “In my work, I try to focus on today's important issues in science and industry, to use them as a beacon to tell me where new theories are needed.”

“I am really glad to help other fields and I am humbled to see this recognised by the panel. For me, the next big project is using latest-generation satellites to create an accurate map of Australia's vegetation; this would serve as the basis for fire-spread models, algae outbreaks detection or pollution management," he added.

After completing his PhD in France, where he received two prestigious awards from the French Space Agency, Dr Petitjean joined the Monash Centre for Data Science in 2013.

Since then, Dr Petitjean has developed a data analysis tool called Chordalysis, which can reveal relationships and influences between the variables of a dataset. Several research teams around the world have already started using Chordalysis for problems as diverse as discovering symptoms of rare diseases, creating heat-resistant anti-inflammatories, and monitoring oil spills in the Mediterranean Sea.

“I like to think of my discipline as something like the support crew for a Formula One team,” Dr Petitjean said. "We computer scientists don’t discover new drugs, proteins, or elementary particles. Rather, we build robust and efficient theories, tools, and technologies that will make those discoveries possible."

Dr Petitjean believes that Big Data holds the key to future scientific progress.

"It’s a bit like the difference between trying to stop a tap from leaking or a firehose, the solutions that are great for the former are simply unthinkable for the latter,” he added. “We are now collecting more data every two years than in the whole history of humanity: we are definitely facing a firehose."

16
Events/Highlights
sensiLab a hit at Melbourne Knowledge Week
From life-hacking to wearables and personal monitoring, our lives are being measured and modified like never before. In order to explore these ideas further, Monash University’s sensiLab set up a fascinating exhibition and panel discussion during Melbourne Knowledge Week, called The Quantified Self – life hacking in the Internet Age. The event was highly attended, with visitors able to engage in a number of intriguing activities.
Events/Highlights

sensiLab a hit at Melbourne Knowledge Week

From life-hacking to wearables and personal monitoring, our lives are being measured and modified like never before. In order to explore these ideas further, Monash University’s sensiLab set up a fascinating exhibition and panel discussion during Melbourne Knowledge Week, called The Quantified Self – life hacking in the Internet Age.

The event was highly attended, with visitors able to engage in a number of intriguing activities.

The Hive Mind was set up like a small gaming centre, connecting multiple users via virtual reality. The virtual landscape that they inhabited was programmed to react to their stress levels and mood - heights of the mountains would grow, water levels would rise, trees would shake and the earth would move, as the group became more stressed.

At the Thoughtforms station, visitors could wear an EEG brain sensor, which measured tiny electrical changes in their brainwaves and converted this data into an abstract three dimensional shape. With a 3D printer, sensiLab were able to bring those thoughtforms into the physical world, producing small 3D printed thoughts, which could then be taken home as a keepsake.

For those who were curious about wearables, the Stress Pendant map was a brilliant demonstration of their potential. sensiLab’s specially created Stress Pendants were worn by a group of 40 volunteers for the week leading up to the event. The volunteers were asked to squeeze the pendant whenever they felt stressed. Data about the location and the time of day was collected from each squeeze, allowing a map of Melbourne’s stress zones to be developed.

The panel discussion, titled Tested on Humans, was no less exciting, with local and international speakers including Rachel Kalmar, Pia van Gelder, Suneel Jethani and Professor Jon McCormack. Emceed by RRR's Warren Davies, the discussion dissected the quantified self movement – how this has driven changes in the way we view and deliver art and design, anthropological and sociological frameworks, physical optimisation, and technological advancement as a whole.

The Quantified Self was one of 60 events held during Melbourne Knowledge Week in 2016. The festival’s theme was, ‘connecting minds, creating change’, and offered the general public a chance to connect with the knowledge sector’s most innovative ideas and thinkers.

16
Education
Excellent results for VCE Algorithmics
VCE Algorithmics, developed partly by Monash University, was the highest performing subjects in the VCE curriculum in 2015. This relatively new subject was introduced to give high school students a more solid grounding in computer science.
Education

Excellent results for VCE Algorithmics

Though it covers challenging topics not usually taught until first year university, Algorithmics was one of the highest performing subjects in the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) curriculum in 2015.

The mean study score for Algorithmics was 35.7 out of 50, a remarkable result. Among all those VCE studies that are normally scaled, Algorithmics did, in fact, emerge as the highest performing one.

The study of algorithmics is not so different to mathematics. According to Professor Bernd Meyer from Monash University’s Faculty of Information Technology, Algorithmics teaches thinking skills that can be applied to any field that requires structured, logical reasoning.

“It’s a really rigorous subject, ideal for students who are interested in maths, computer science and software engineering,” he said. “It equips students with a conceptual framework that enables them to reason on a higher level in a very diverse range of fields, from the sciences to law and economics.”

“What we’re teaching them is a particular way of thinking, which allows them to analyse problems structurally and to systematically explore different strategies for designing solutions,” Professor Meyer added.

Algorithmics is relatively new to the VCE – it was only offered to students for the first time last year. The topic is usually taught at a tertiary level as part of a computer science degree, but VCE Algorithmics has been developed by Monash University and Melbourne University specifically to bridge the gap between secondary and tertiary IT studies.

“Teenagers are naturals at using technology,” Professor Meyer said, “But if we want to enable them to become creators and to shape the future of technology, they need a solid grounding in computer science. This is different from just teaching coding.”

According to Professor Meyer, “everybody is talking about coding now, but without algorithmics, you cannot become a good programmer. Programming is algorithmics plus coding. Algorithmics defines the logic of a program, coding is the implementation. The challenge in solving really hard problems, like natural language interpretation, computer vision, or intelligent robotics is far more in the logic, in the algorithms, than in the coding.”

Professor Meyer likes to quote the celebrated computer scientist and Turing-award winner Edsger Dijkstra, who said, “Computer Science is as much about computers as astronomy is about telescopes.” So it’s not surprising that, despite the close relationship to computer science, much of the course work in Algorithmics is performed “unplugged” – away from the computer screen.

The focus on problem solving and that there is no need to wrangle a machine could be some of the reasons why Algorithmics attracted such a large proportion of girls, compared to other IT subjects in the VCE. Around 33% of the students taking Algorithmics in 2015 were female.

Algorithmics is a Higher Education Scored Study (HESS) subject, which means that students who successfully undertake it will be able to gain credit towards their university course, as well as being able to use their study score fully towards their ATAR.

16
Research
Joint Cyber Security Lab launched
A joint cyber security research group has just been established by Monash University and Jinan University. The agreement builds on the cyber security expertise of the two universities, and will enable their researchers to jointly address the challenges in this area.
Research

Joint Cyber Security Lab launched

A joint cyber security research group has just been established by Monash University and Jinan University in China. The international lab was formalised during a successful visit to Guangzhou, China, by staff from Monash, and will enable co-operative research efforts between the two universities.

According to Dr Campbell Wilson, who is Associate Dean International at Monash’s Faculty of Information Technology, the major activities of the lab will include joint research projects; the opportunity for academic staff, and postgraduate students from one university to visit the other; joint projects with industry; and setting up a student exchange program between the universities.

“This is an exciting opportunity for Monash University and Jinan University to co-operate in an increasingly important area of information technology research,” said Dr Wilson. He went on to describe how the agreement builds on the cyber security expertise of the two universities, enabling researchers to jointly address the challenges in this area.

“We look forward to what will be undoubtedly be a fruitful collaboration,” he added.

As part of formal discussions about the project, Dr Wilson gave an overview of Monash and the Faculty of IT, and the Executive Dean of the College of Cyber Security at Jinan University, Professor Jian Weng, introduced the work of Jinan University. Also attending on behalf of Monash were Associate Professor Carsten Rudolph, Dr Ron Steinfeld and Dr Joseph Liu; with Vice-President of Jinan University Professor Xianzhong Song and Director of Office of International Exchange and Cooperation Professor Pu Rouqian representing Jinan University.

After discussing the areas of collaboration that will arise from the joint lab, a formal signing ceremony marked the official opening, with Dr Wilson and Professor Weng signing the agreement on behalf of their respective universities.

Associate Professor Rudolph, Dr Steinfeld and Dr Liu concluded the visit by presenting a series of seminars to staff and students from Jinan University. The Monash representatives also met with potential industry partners interested in supporting a joint project between Monash and Jinan Universities.

While the visit acknowledged the 110-year history of Jinan University, the focus was on the future and the potential the joint lab on cyber security holds for Monash and Jinan Universities, as well as cyber security research as a whole.

16
Events/Highlights
Shannon Centenary celebrated at Monash
Learn more about the work of Claude Elwood Shannon – Father of Information Theory. His remarkable work laid the foundation for efficient, reliable and secure communication, a theory which underlies much of the telecommunications technology we rely upon today.
Events/Highlights

Shannon Centenary celebrated at Monash

Claude Elwood Shannon may be one of the most important people you’ve never heard of. He’s known as the Father of Information Theory – his remarkable work laid the foundation for efficient, reliable and secure communication, a theory which underlies much of the telecommunications technology we rely upon today.

A mathematician and engineer, Shannon was born 100 years ago, in April 1916. The centenary of his birth has been celebrated around the world with conferences and events, the unveiling of monuments both digital and physical, even a Google Doodle.

The Faculty of Information Technology at Monash University held its own Claude Shannon Centenary Celebration on Friday the 6th of May, 2016. The event consisted of a series of short talks outlining Shannon’s life and work, followed by lunch.

The event was very well attended, with around 100 people arriving on the day, including 20 high school students from John Monash Science School, as well as staff and students from the Faculty of IT, people from the Maths Department and the Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering at Monash.

Informative and enjoyable, the event was a fitting celebration of the significant impact Shannon had on our world.

Want to know more? Please feel free to watch and share this short video we made about Shannon and the Centenary Celebration at Monash by clicking here.

The Shannon Centenary event was supported by IEEE.

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The creation of Monash University’s Faculty of Information Technology (originally the Faculty of Computing and Information Technology) in 1990 was one of the major outcomes of the merger of Monash University and Chisholm Institute of Technology. Long standing departments from Chisholm and Monash were drawn together under a new faculty banner which sought to unify these two institutions and emphasise their similarities. Each department brought its own distinctive character and identity to the new faculty, which was shaped by the history of each institution and the way that computing and computer science had emerged within it.

Our timeline is a celebration of twenty-five years as a faculty but it will also highlight the history of how this faculty came to be. It will explore the development of computer and information technology within these two educational institutions, and how they managed to become the vibrant, innovative, high quality institution it is today.

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Faculty Admissions Office
Faculty of Information Technology
Building 72, Clayton campus
Monash University
VIC 3800

Tel: 1800 MONASH (1800 666 274) within Australia

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